Camera Price Charts Episode VI: DSLRs vs Mirrorless (Full Frame)

And now the last installment in the July 2017 series, we are zooming in on a DSLR vs Mirrorless tet-a-tet with 35mm full frame sensors! The focus is on made-for-digital mirrorless cameras, meaning no rangefinders in this particular comparison.

JULY 2017 SERIES

+ 35mm FULL FRAME digital cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs
+ Mirrorless Cameras
+ Fixed Lens Cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs vs Mirrorless
+ 35mm Full Frame dSLRs vs Mirrorless

Where Does The Data Come From?

This chart uses the data collected for the 35mm FULL FRAME digital cameras as set forth in that post. No new data was collected for this post.

THE 35mm FF COUNT (Number of Cameras)

35mm FF DSLRs 15
35mm FF Mirrorless 8

A 3-WAY FULL FRAME COMPETITION

As you can see in the chart below, this is a game for Canon, Nikon and Sony. Sony is the only one that has both a 35mm full frame DSLR and mirrorless cameras. The only other manufacturers playing at this sensor size is Pentax (DSLR) and Leica (SL).

Since there are two DSLR makers focusing on this segment, it’s not a surprise that DSLRs are almost doubling the mirrorless cameras. The prices, as you can see below, are fairly interleaved. We even have a mild surprise, the Leica is not the most expensive camera in this chart 🙂

The DSLRs in the chart below have their name highlighted in yellow. You can see a larger version of the chart by opening it directly and zoom and zoom as needed.

NOTES and FOOTNOTES

  • Prices are more or less uniform among the three tracked retailers
  • Typos, errors, confusions, omissions are always possible. Please leave a comment or use the online contact form. If I don’t notice an error and no one mentions it, it won’t get fixed on its own 🙂

PREVIOUS YEARS

This is the first time we have introduced this comparative chart!

Camera Price Charts July 2017 Episode V: APS-C Civil War: DSLRs vs Mirrorless

And now we have a new entry in our Price Charts series. It is an APS-C interchangeable lens camera civil war! DSLRs vs Mirrorless cameras! How do the prices compare? Who has more options in the market? Details at 11 (okay, right below)…

JULY 2017 SERIES

+ 35mm FULL FRAME digital cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs
+ Mirrorless Cameras
+ Fixed Lens Cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs vs Mirrorless
+ 35mm Full Frame dSLRs vs Mirrorless

Where Does The Data Come From?

This chart uses the data collected for the APS-C dSLRs and Mirrorless Cameras as set forth in those two posts. No new data was collected for this post (in case you are wondering why some cameras are body only, and some are with kit lenses).

THE ASP-C COUNT (Number of Cameras)

APS-C DSLRs 26
APS-C Mirrorless 20

This is the number of cameras in the two charts below (under $1000 and over $1000). If you are recounting, make sure you don’t count the D7200 twice since it appears in both charts.

APS-C Price War: DSLRs vs Mirrorless!

There are so many cameras out there in this segment, we split the chart in two pieces. Under $1000 and over $1000. To make it easier to visually absorb the data, DSLRs have their name highlighted in yellow. This also makes it easier to spot clusters and patterns as you go up the price ladder.

The bottom price tier is competitive with both DSLRs and mirrorless cameras getting interleaved. As we go the middle ($550 to $700), we have a DSLR-heavy cluster, and above that, up to $1000, it’s mirrorless time, as different manufacturers price-position their enthusiast models.

And now to the over $1000 price range. The Nikon D7200 is included in both charts as a visual anchor to virtually stitch together the two data streams.

A mild surprise, if not a shocker here, a Leica camera is NOT the most expensive one of the lot! Their both DSLR and Mirrorless APS-C cameras that cost more than the Leica entry. My-oh-my 🙂

Nikon is pricing their APS-C top tier higher than Canon at the moment, which of course could easily change when newer Canon models come out. On the mirrorless front, Fuji is out-pricing Sony, but Sony has a wild line-up of 35mm full frame cameras to compare in terms of price, while Fuji’s next stop price-wise is their GFX medium format system. So it makes sense for Fuji to be pushing up their prices.

“Take Pictures With” Kits

This chart, as in previous installments, only includes kits that include a lens with them. A “take pictures with” kit. This is something a beginner in a particular system would buy, because it’s hard to take pictures without a lens 🙂

Just like above, the DSLR names are in yellow highlight to make it easier to distinguish. Once upon a time it may have been easier to distinguish simply by the names, but it’s getting more complicated now with multiple companies having both mirrorless and DSLR line-ups.

You don’t need to do a count or recount here, there are more DSLRs, and they seem to cluster at the top and bottom of the price chart, with mirrorless in the gooey middle. While cameras are not smartphones, there are some pretty old DSLRs at the bottom price tier. But all three of the major APS-C mirrorless manufacturers have $500 or less options, with Fuji perhaps deciding that it can’t win a price war with Sony and Canon.

HOMEWORK EXERCISE

One fun exercise you can do if you want to have some hypothetical fun is to look at the price-ranges and compare how much of a camera you are getting compared to its neighbors. For example, if you jump in at $700, what are your trade-offs? Do any cameras stand out as bang-for-the-buck? Do others stand out as overpriced?

Please feel free to opine or think out loud in the comments if you like!

NOTES and FOOTNOTES

  • Prices are more or less uniform among the three tracked retailers
  • Typos, errors, confusions, omissions are always possible. Please leave a comment or use the online contact form. If I don’t notice an error and no one mentions it, it won’t get fixed on its own 🙂

PREVIOUS YEARS

This is the first time we have introduced this comparative chart!

Camera Price Charts July 2017 Episode IV: Serious Fixed Lens Cameras

Part IV of our July 2017 “Price Charts” series is here, focusing on Serious Fixed Lens cameras of all kinds. This year, I removed cameras with 1/2.x” sensors from consideration ~ sensors growing in size in all directions, even in smartphones.

JULY 2017 SERIES

+ 35mm FULL FRAME digital cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs
+ Mirrorless Cameras
+ Fixed Lens Cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs vs Mirrorless
+ 35mm Full Frame dSLRs vs Mirrorless

Where Does The Data Come From?

The prices are the consensus prices between Amazon and B&H Photo and Adorama as of July 7 in 2017. The article is posted a week after the data was gather due to delays (Prime Day festivities and such). These are new condition with USA warranty prices, from authorized dealers. Older cameras that are no longer available in new condition with USA warranty from the above retailers, or are available in a very limited fashion, are not included.

ALIVE AND KICKING

This segment of the market did not have as many new models since our previous update in November 2016, but there are still certainly plenty of choices in the market, going from $400 to $4250. The two new entries were the Fuji X100F, a continuation in the very popular series, and the second generation of the Canon G9X.

However, we lost more cameras than we gained in this segment, older models mostly (Fuji X100T, X30, Canon G7X, Leica X Typ 113, X-E Typ 102 [these are awkwardly goofy names] and X2, Sigma DP2 Merrill, Lytro Illum and Panasonic FZ300. Also gone is the Nikon DL series which is a bit of an existential discussion, since we never really had them in the first place. So the losses are cyclical phase outs, nothing to really worry about despite the difference between IN and OUT.

One philosophical way to divide this market is the lens. There are three subgroups, the Prime lenses (eg Fuji X100F, Ricoh GR II), the modest zooms (eg Canon G, Sony RX100), and a fairly new entrant, the superzooms (Panasonic-made cameras only).

Sony and Canon dominate this segment with elaborate line-ups. Canon has six models ranging from $400 to $850, while Sony has a …soccer team of them, a total of 11 cameras in the RX-series. All five of the RX100 models are still alive and kicking in the market (a rarity considering these are not even professional DSLRs who usually have longer staying power), and so are the the three RX10 models, and the three RX1* models. Sony’s line is even more diverse, ranging in price from $450 to $3300, and in sensor size from 1-inch to 35mm full frame. Canon on the other hand operates in a more narrow price range, $400 to $850, and sensor size (1 to 1.5).

Panasonic is making a strong move in this segment now that three of their superzoom models have moved from the tiny 1/2.x” sensors to 1-inch. Not just the FZ-series but also the top ZS-series model. These three, along with a two tier classic LX-series give them a five model line-up ranging from $650 to $1200. Panasonic is unique in this group in that they are unapologetically pursuing superzooms in this segment (there’s also a Leicasonic remodel of one of them).

Fuji is perhaps one of the companies taking credit for rejuvenating interest in this segment with the launch of the X100 series way back, but now that they have a more elaborate X System line-up, they are not as aggressive with their line-up size. They have just two models, the X100F leading the way, and the X70 for almost half the price.

Nikon, Olympus, and Pentax are not in this market segment, but Pentax’s mothership continues to offer the Ricoh GR II.

A bit of a surprise perhaps to those not following closely, Leica has built a bit of a line-up in this segment as well, partially thanks to their cooperation with Panasonic. Leica has four models, each one with a different size sensors. Leica’s own models are priced Leica-style, they are the two higher prices.

Also having a four model line-up quietly is Sigma and the Foveon generation with four dp-series Quattro. This is more of a narrow band line-up, with the models being within $150 of each other, and similar in many ways.

THE APS-C RAWSUMERS

Another way to divide this segment is by sensor size. We have a lot of variety here, going from 1″ up to 35mm full frame. The two busiest segments are the APS-C and 1-inch sensor sizes. Of the 33 cameras in this segment, 26 of them are in these two segments.

Considering the abundance of APS-C DSLRs and Mirrorless cameras, one would expect to have more entries in this segment. Their number here is a bit inflated because of the quartet of Quattros (sorry, I couldn’t resist). Sony, Canon and Panasonic are not “playing” in this segment at the moment. But it got one of the two new entries this year in the Fuji X100F. And it is blessed with an original Leica too 🙂

THE 1-INCH SENSORS

This is the most populous segment in terms of sensor size, it’s the Battle of Evermore between Sony and Canon with the RX100-series vs the G-series! We had the other new entry in this segment, the second generation of the Canon G9X. But with the embrace of 1-inch sensors in superzooms, Panasonic is now becoming a player in this segment as well.

In fact, when you consider that the Leica entry here is based on a Panasonic camera, these are the only three actual manufacturers in this segment. The Nikon DL-series had a 1-inch sensor but it is no more.

NOTES and FOOTNOTES

  • Prices are more or less uniform among the three tracked retailers
  • Typos, errors, confusions, omissions are always possible. Please leave a comment or use the online contact form. If I don’t notice an error and no one mentions it, it won’t get fixed on its own 🙂

PREVIOUS YEARS

Camera Price Charts July 2017 Episode III: Mirrorless [Revised]

Part III of our July 2017 “Price Charts” series is here, focusing on Mirrorless cameras of all kinds. Rangefinders are not included, nor cameras with sensors larger than 35mm. This is the Revised Edition!

JULY 2017 SERIES

+ 35mm FULL FRAME digital cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs
+ Mirrorless Cameras
+ Fixed Lens Cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs vs Mirrorless
+ 35mm Full Frame dSLRs vs Mirrorless

REVISION 7/16/17

Name Correction: the Fuji X-A10 was previously written as Fuji X10. It has now been corrected. Thanks to our readers for the alert!

REVISION 7/15/17

Three mirrorless cameras were missing from the original post. They have been added in this 7/15/17 revision. The prices of those three cameras were recorded in the same week as the original post. The missing cameras that have been added are:

+ Sony a6500
+ YI M1 (with 12-40)
+ Fuji X-A10 (with 16-50) [CORRECTED]

If there are any others missing, please leave a comment or use the online contact form. I love corrections, don’t by shy!

The original version has been preserved in a separate page.

Where Does The Data Come From?

The prices are the consensus prices between Amazon and B&H Photo and Adorama as of July 5th in 2017. These are new condition with USA warranty prices, from authorized dealers.

All the prices are the body only kit prices for cameras that officially have this option. Some cameras do not have official body-only kits (or no longer have them). Fro those, I am including their lowest priced kit (typically the with 16-50 or with 12-32 or with 18-55). Older cameras that are no longer available in new condition with USA warranty from the above retailers, or are available in a very limited fashion, are not included.

THE FLAGSHIPS PER SYSTEM

Like previous years, we start with a chart that has the flagship (in terms of price) for each of the mirrorless systems that have active cameras. We had three new flagships this year, highlighted in yellow below, the Panasonic GH5, the Sigma SD Quattro H, and the Sony a9 II which pushed upwards Sony’s flagship prices from the Sony a7R II last year.

Flagship prices are very stubborn, all the remaining flagships from last year have the same price, except for the lowest price one that dropped $50, the Canon M5.

The Nikon V3 may be odd to see here, but it is readily available at all three of the tracked retailers, that’s why it’s included here 🙂

SO MANY MIRRORLESS CAMERAS, SO LITTLE TIME

Yikes, look at this mega chart. So many mirrorless cameras out there! Click on the picture below to see the full size, or open it directly and then use your browser or imaging software to zoom and zoom and zoom until you get it to an agreeable size.

We have a price staircase from $350 all the way up to $2000. After that, it is less so. It is rather fascinating how the chaotic randomness of pricing of so many cameras looks so …organized.

With the Pentax Q-S1 finally out of stock, and the Nikon 1-System on its last legs (but still available at retail), sensor sizes are increasing on average. We also have an APS-H option in the new Sigma SD Quattro H. We don’t track anything larger than 35mm FF in these charts, but Fuji launched the GFX system as well.

But sensor size does not dictate pricing. The Olympus E-M1 II and Panasonic GH5 are in the Top 6 most expensive cameras even though they have a M43rds sensor. Likewise, the Sony a7 is a 35mm full frame camera, but cameras with all kinds of smaller sensor sizes cost more than it does.

With so many cameras, it’s not a surprise to have cameras from different manufacturers have the same names. Olympus and Canon both have M5 and M10 models, while Olympus, Fuji and YI have or had M1 cameras 🙂

It is rather interesting that we had new cameras from both niche systems and mainstream systems since the previous update in November 2016. On the more niche front, there is the new Leica TL, the new Sigma Quattro H (yes, APS-H), and another Canon EF-M in the M6. Panasonic added the GH5 and GX850, Sony went high up with the a9 II and a6500 (the new APS-C leader), and Fuji added the X-T20 and X-A10. We also had a new entry in M43rds with the YI Technology M1.

A number of cameras from the previous chart are now gone, including the Olympus E-P5 (only available at one of the three retailers in limited fashion), the Leica T, and a quarter of Fujis in the X-PRO 1, X-A2, X-A1, and X-M1. More goodbyes from Olympus, the E-M1 and E-M10 (first generation), along with the E-PL7. The other side of M43rds had its goodbyes too with the G5 and GM1, along with the GX85 body only (the GX85 w/12-32 continues). Last but not least, the remaining inventory of the good old Pentax Q-S1 is now gone 🙂

The Take PICTURES WITH KITS

This chart is interesting because it shows how much one is expected to pay to get a “take pictures with” kit, often of interest to newcomers to a system, or beginners in interchangeable-lens photography…

I am capping these (just like APS-C dSLRs to a maximum of $700, since at that price, we start getting more into the enthusiast level where other lenses may be preferred.

There are two new releases from the big name manufactures since the previous post in November 2016, the Panasonic GX850 and Fuji X-A10, along with a new M43rds entry by chinese company “YI Technology”, a friend of Xiaomi’s. Chart wise, there are more additions to the chart simply because some cameras dropped price enough to be included here, and others got discontinued, so it created space for theme. Just like with dSLRs, there is no fierce competition to the price bottom any more. YI is the new entry, so it’s not a surprise they are trying to undercut the competition.

NOTES and FOOTNOTES

  • The YI M1 with 12-40mm price was $350 during the week of data capture. It has since dropped to $300 for the Prime Day festivities. These posts are snapshots of prices, so that’s why you see the $350 price. These are not intended to be permanent price trackers
  • Prices are more or less uniform among the three tracked retailers
  • Typos, errors, confusions, omissions are always possible. Please leave a comment or use the online contact form. If I don’t notice an error and no one mentions it, it won’t get fixed on its own 🙂

PREVIOUS YEARS

Camera Price Charts July 2017 Episode II: APS-C DSLRs Persist

Part II of our July 2017 “Price Charts” series is here, focusing on APS-C DSLRs. Other cameras with APS-C size sensors will be listed in their appropriate categories, either Mirrorless or Fixed Lens Cameras. Yesterday we covered the 35mm Full Frame Cameras (all kinds, not just DSLRs). They are grouped like this to keep the groups at a manageable size and logically meaningful.

JULY 2017 SERIES

+ 35mm FULL FRAME digital cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs
+ Mirrorless Cameras
+ Fixed Lens Cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs vs Mirrorless
+ 35mm Full Frame dSLRs vs Mirrorless

Where Does The Data Come From?

The prices are the consensus prices between Amazon and B&H Photo and Adorama as of July 4th in 2017. These are new condition with USA warranty prices, from authorized dealers.

All the prices are the body only kit prices for cameras that officially have this option. Some entry-level APS-C DSLRs do not have official body-only kits (or no longer have them). Fro those, I am including their lowest priced kit (typically the “with 18-55”). Older cameras that are no longer available in new condition with USA warranty from the above retailers, or are available in a very limited fashion, are not included.

APS-C DSLRs PERSIST

The increasing number of Full Frame cameras and the popularity of mirrorless cameras have not killed the APS-C dSLRs as some doomsayers had been predicting through the years. The APS-C market continues to add new models, with multiple Canons and Nikons, along with the Pentax KP.

The six new DSLRs introduced this year have their name in the chart below in yellow highlight. The yellow highlighter also tells the story of where most of the action is these days in the world of APS-C DSLRs. The days of the tooth and nail battle for the entry level are over, both Canon and Nikon are in cruise control of status quo models.

The death of more advanced APS-C DSLRs was another thing full frame doomsayers had been predicting, but it hasn’t happened either. Both Canon and Nikon continue maintain a “DSLR price staircase” almost up to $2000. Pentax has their unicorn full frame DSLR, but they still introduced a new four figure APS-C model.

We have a new price leader this year. Thanks to a $100 price increase of the Nikon D500 and a discount of the Sigma SD1, the Nikon D500 is now the Price Leader. Last Year, the roles were reversed, with the Sigma SD1 Merrill Foveon leading the $way$.

The chart below shows the lowest price per camera. Body only kits are listed, except when there isn’t an official body only ~ then we list the lowest price kit.

You can view a larger size with this or click on the chart below…

The chart below only shows “Take Pictures With” kits. These are the official “DSLR with Lens” kits. We include the lowest priced kit for each camera, typically the “with 18-55 kit”. I am capping the table below to $700, as it intended to show how much first-time and entry-point buyers are expected to pay for a “take pictures with” kit.

There was only one new camera in this section, the $700 Canon SL2 with 18-55, that’s why there’s only one yellow highlighter on the left hand side. As you can see, there are not that many spring chickens in the list. In terms of buyers, these are also competing with manufacturer refurbished options of themselves along with the used market. All reasonable options considering the current market.

NOTES and FOOTNOTES

  • NEW entries in this years charts include the Canon 77D, SL2, D-Rebel T7i, the Nikon D7500 and D5600, and the Pentax KP
  • Because of limited availability, this is not included in the chart above: the Nikon D7100 ($700) is only available at B&H ~ same thing as last year
  • removed since the previous chart are the Canon SL1 Body Only (the w/18-55 remains), Nikon D7100, D3200 kits, and Sony a58 w/18-55
  • Prices are more or less uniform among the three tracked retailers, the notable exceptions are the Sigma SD1, and Pentax KP
  • the Canon D-Rebel T5i remains an oddball as it was last year, the body only is actually $50 more expensive than the “with 18-55” kit
  • Typos, errors, confusions, omissions are always possible. Please leave a comment or use the online contact form. If I don’t notice an error and no one mentions it, it won’t get fixed on its own 🙂

PREVIOUS YEARS

Camera Price Charts July 2017 Episode I: Almost Full Frame For All

And we are back with an early July 2017 edition of our snapshot of camera prices in the US market. We start with the 35mm full frame digital cameras, grouping together all kinds, DSLRs, mirrorless, walletfinders (okay, rangefinders), and fixed lens. Because Medium and Large Format is a small niche (all things considered), we are not tracking their prices here…

JULY 2017 SERIES

+ 35mm FULL FRAME digital cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs
+ Mirrorless Cameras
+ Fixed Lens Cameras
+ APS-C dSLRs vs Mirrorless
+ 35mm Full Frame dSLRs vs Mirrorless

Where Does The Data Come From?

The prices are the consensus prices between Amazon and B&H Photo and Adorama as of July 3rd in 2017. These are new condition with USA warranty prices, from authorized dealers. All the prices are the body only kit prices. Older cameras that are no longer available in new condition with USA warranty from the above retailers, or are available in a very limited fashion, are not included.

FAIRLY STABLE 35MM FULL FRAME PRICES

Steady as she goes is the theme here. About half of the cameras that were tracked in November 2016 have the same price now as they did last year.

Even though digital cameras are adding more “smartphone features”, their prices are not quite mirroring flagship smartphone prices. A number of cameras have the same price as they did in our previous update in November 2016. Most of the Sony cameras had price drops since then, but Canons and Nikon stayed put more than they got discounted. A few cameras even went up in price since the last update, most of which were Leicas. The only big discount is the Leica SL Typ 601 that is on sale at B&H Photo but has the same price as last year at Adorama and Amazon.

This is the first time we officially have a sub-$1000 35mm full frame interchangeable lens camera, in new condition, sold at authorized dealers. It is the Sony a7 [CORRECTED] going for $948. It is not a surprise that is the challenger (Sony) offering this and not the Canon/Nikon duo.

Meanwhile Leica got out-trolled/out-priced at the top of the price spectrum with the 100 Year anniversary edition of the Nikon D5 leapfrogging a number of Leica rangefinders.

After the Sony a7, the prices between $1400 and $4550 have a fairly steady staircase pattern, offering various options at each price range.

The mix is as before, DSLRs and mirrorless cameras on the bottom and middle, and rangefinders and pro DSLRs dominating the upper price tier.

Here is the full size chart or click on the one below to see a bigger version…

NOTES and FOOTNOTES

  • Because of very limited availability, these are not included in the chart above: the Sony a99V ($2000) and Canon 1D X ($4600) and 1D C ($5000) and Nikon D4S ($5500). The a99v magically resurfaced at Amazon, while the last three are B&H only
  • Prices are more or less uniform among the three tracked retailers, the notable exception is the Pentax K-1 which goes for almost $1900 at B&H and Adorama, but a price-bot price-match dropped the price down at Amazon
  • new entries in this years charts include the Canon 6D Mark II, the Sony a9 II, the Leica M10, and the Nikon D5 100 Year Anniversary Edition
  • Typos, errors, confusions, omissions are always possible. Please leave a comment or use the online contact form. If I don’t notice an error and no one mentions it, it won’t get fixed on its own 🙂

PREVIOUS YEARS

Camera Price Charts 2016 Episode IV: Serious Fixed Lens Cameras

In Episode #1 of the November 2016 series, we took a look at the prices of all 35mm Full Frame Digital Cameras… In Episode #2, we took a look at APS-C DSLRs… In Episode III, we take a look at prices of Mirrorless Cameras… In this post (episode IV), we take a look at some of the serious fixed lens cameras aka RAWsumers…

Where Does The Data Come From?

The prices are the consensus prices between Amazon and B&H Photo and Adorama as of November 3 in 2016. These are new condition with USA warranty prices, from authorized dealers. Older cameras that are no longer available in new condition with USA warranty from the above retailers, or are available in a very limited fashion, are not included.

Serious Fixed Lens Cameras – The Big Picture

We have a pretty steady progression of prices from $450 to $2000, with the majority of the cameras narrowing down to three sensor sizes, 1-inch, APS-C, and 35mm full frame. 2/3″ used to be more popular, and so was 1/1.7″, while the Canon G1 X* line is the only one carrying the flag for 1.5″. I am no longer adding new 1/2.3″ cameras to the chart but there is one hold-out from the previous chart (FZ300).

Canon and Sony are doubling down on this segment by keeping multiple active cameras in their line-up, Canon has six models, and Sony has eleven, keeping all models around of three separate lines, the RX100 (five models), and the RX10 and RX1 (three models each). Panasonic too is continuing with an LX and FZ track. Nikon’s re-entry happened with a trio of new cameras under the DL line (to be released by the end of the year). Fuji cooled off on this segment, but offered a lower-priced APS-C model.

Just like the other November 2016 categories, some prices have actually/surprisingly gone up, some went down, many stayed the same. We see the same price pattern here, where the race to the price-bottom is essentially over.

The picture below gives you a bird’s eye view. Click twice on it or view the full size PNG for a more readable version (only 50K).

price_charts_2016_flc_mega

The APS-C RAWsumers

Things were fairly quiet in the world of APS-C, with Fuji giving their X100* a lower priced parallel APS-C model with the X70. The only other new camera was a waterproof variation on a Leica theme (X-U Typ 113). Remaining are two famous models among aficionados of this segment, the X100T and Ricoh GR II.

price_charts_2016_flc_aps_c

The 1-inch Sensors Dominate the RAWsumers

One clear pattern that emerged this year is that the 1-inch sensor cameras are dominating the RAWsumer segment. Nine of the eleven new cameras in this segment have 1-inch sensors, including Nikon’s new line of DLs. Sony, Panasonic and Canon all released new models at this size. Their prices are well spaced, with a dense $600 to $1000 section in the middle.

price_charts_2016_flc_oneinch

PREVIOUS YEARS

Footnotes

  • Prices as of November 3 in 2016 – see second paragraph above for details
  • Prices are more or less uniform among the three tracked retailers
  • New additions since the previous chart include the Nikon DL trio, the Sony RX10 III and RX100 V, the Panasonic LX10 and ZS100 and FZ2500, the Fuji X70, and Canon G7 X II and the Leica X-U T113 and such
  • Gone since the previous chart are the Ricoh GR, PAnasonic CM1, LX7 and FZ200, Nikon P7800, Fuji XF1, XQ1, XQ2, X-S1, Canon G16 and S120, Olympus Stylus 1S, and such
  • Typos, errors, confusions, omissions are always possible. Please leave a comment or use the online contact form. If I don’t notice an error and no one mentions it, it won’t get fixed on its own 🙂

Camera Price Charts 2016 Episode III: The Mirrorless Expansion

In Episode #1 of the November 2016 series, we took a look at the prices of all 35mm Full Frame Digital Cameras… In Episode #2, we took a look at APS-C DSLRs… In this post (Episode III), we take a look at prices of mirrorless cameras. As usual, we do not include rangefinders in this category, and we do not include sensors larger than 35mm since those are very niche (but we saw action there too with the Fuji medium format GFX 50S).

Where Does The Data Come From?

The prices are the consensus prices between Amazon and B&H Photo and Adorama as of November 2 in 2016. These are new condition with USA warranty prices, from authorized dealers. Prices are the body only kit, except for cameras without an official body-only kit – we use the lowest priced standard kit (eg w/18-55) for those. Older cameras that are no longer available in new condition with USA warranty from the above retailers, or are available in a very limited fashion, are not included.

Flagship Mirrorless Prices as of November 2016

There are many mirrorless cameras out there, so we start by taking a look at the flagship camera of each system. Samsung is out of the market now, while finally Canon decided to get serious with a more advanced mirrorless camera, so we are including it here. Sigma too joined the party with the SD Quattro. Their APS-H camera does not have a price yet, so the non-H is the current flagship ~ we only look at real aka “purchasable” products in these price charts. The Pentax Q-S1 is still lingering around but I can’t find enough loopholes to call it a flagship camera, adorkable as it may be 🙂

Leica price-leads the way and with that price, it will remain a champion until the next Leica camera. Sony’s price-flagship having the 35mm full frame sensor is also guaranteed a second place. Olympus played price-leapfrog with the E-M1 II, whose price was revealed a few days ago [see Stock Status Tracker] jumping ahead of Fuji’s latest entries. The Panasonic GH4 and Nikon V3 remained the same flagships as last year.

In yellow highlight below are the new releases since our previous price-chart…

price_charts_2016_mirrorless_flagships

Mirrorless Prices as of November 2016

Compare and contrast the size of this monster chart below with the one of APS-C DSLRs and you can tell where a lot of the action is happening. We had roughly twice as many new mirrorless cameras in 2016 than APS-C DSLRs. If it wasn’t for the “Export As Image” option, the chart below would have to be two parts 🙂

Click on the image twice to see it at maximum size (unless you are on a giant vertical monitor) or open the full size PNG file (fear not, it’s only 55K, it won’t eat up your mobile data).

price_charts_2016_mirrorless_mega

The Pentax Q-S1 with its atom ant sized sensor is leading the price-bottom in both charts, but sensor-size is not always a factor in pricing. There is a wild mix of 1″ and M43 and APS-C and 35mm Full Frame. For example, the $1100 35mmFF Sony a7 is in the middle, and costs less than the Nikon V3 with its “Angry Inch” sensor 🙂

Just like with DSLRs, the race to the price-bottom is over. Most of the sub-$400 cameras are older. As usual with these charts, we feature the body only price, unless a particular camera does not have an official body-only kit. In those cases, we feature the lowest priced kit (most of the time it’s the w/14-42 or w/18-55 and such). This is why you see some cameras in the chart with lenses next to their names.

To save the chart from being totally unreadable, I removed the Leica SL Typ 601, which you can see in all its price glory in the Flagships chart at the top. Its price flattened almost all the other entries in the cart.

Taking a bird’s eye view, shows a steady progression of prices from $200 to $2200, so anyone buying specific price points, won’t have trouble finding something 🙂 This kinda feels healthy and organic – I think.

While doing this it became painfully obvious that Panasonic’s naming scheme is/was in sharp need of a reboot. They have very similarly-named cameras, and the combination of letters and numbers they use is just too similar and overlapping and confusing and non-distinct 🙂 Imagine how the average consumer must feel looking at the soup of Gs and Xs and Fs and 7s and 8s 🙂

The “Take Pictures With” Kits

Body only options are great if you already have lenses or if you are a serious/advanced photographer and you are planning to buy non-entry-level lenses. But for a beginner or someone dipping their toes into a new system (without taking a big financial risk), the “Take Pictures with Kits” (TPwK) are important, since you are ready to take pictures. Some of the cameras that are listed as Body Only in the mega chart above appear here with their kit lenses. This only covers lower prices, where TPwKs are more relevant. Under $650 is the cut-off point, which is why there’s only one new camera (yellow highlighter).

price_charts_2016_mirrorless_tpwk

Again, as you can see above, the race to the price-bottom days are over, so for someone looking for lower prices, the used/refurbished market may be an option to look at.

PREVIOUS YEARS

Footnotes

  • Prices as of November 1 in 2016 – see second paragraph above for details
  • Prices are more or less uniform among the three tracked retailers
  • New additions since the previous chart include the Fuji X-T2, X-PRO2, X-E2S, X-A3, Olympus E-M1 II, E-PL8, and Pen-F, Canon M5, Sigma SD Quattro, Sony a6300, Panasonic G85 and GX85, and such
  • Gone from last year’s chart are the Samsung line-up, Fuji X-E2 and X-E1, Nikon S2, Olympus E-M5, E-M10, E-PL6, Panasonic GF6, GF7, GH3, GM5, GX7, and such
  • Typos, errors, confusions, omissions are always possible. Please leave a comment or use the online contact form. If I don’t notice an error and no one mentions it, it won’t get fixed on its own 🙂